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DENVER — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) are seeking information in the poisoning deaths of a golden eagle and ravens in the area southwest of Wamsutter, west of the Eureka Headquarters, in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.

Investigating officers responded to the area in March 2016 and recovered the bodies of one poisoned golden eagle and four poisoned ravens, which were all dead when found, along with poison-laced baits. The tragedy of illegal poisoning is that it indiscriminately kills any wildlife or pet that feeds on the poison-laced baits, and can even harm humans.

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The perpetrator(s) of this crime appear to have been targeting native predators, including eagles and coyotes. A search of the area revealed no dead coyotes.

The Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act protects bald and golden eagles, and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act protects eagles and ravens. The indiscriminate killing of wildlife by the placement of poison is illegal and endangers all wildlife and pets in poison-laced areas. Golden eagles are considered a declining species in many areas of the United States and this recent poisoning incident will only further imperil the species.

The Service is asking for the public’s help and offering a monetary reward of up to $2,000 for information leading to the successful arrest and conviction of the person(s) associated with the poisoning of these and other animals in Wyoming. Individuals submitting information leading to a conviction can be eligible for a reward through the Wyoming Wildlife Protector’s Association as well. Members of the public who report information can remain anonymous.

If you have any information about this or any wildlife poisoning in Wyoming, please contact the Service’s Lander, Wyoming, Office of Law Enforcement at 307-332-7607 or [email protected], or contact the WGFD Stop Poaching Hotline at 1-877-WGFD-TIP (1-877-943-3847). You can call to report violations day or night and on holidays. You can report violations by texting “WGFD” to TIP411 (847-411) or through the WGFD website. You can also call your local game warden.

The above information was shared by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service today, February 25th. 

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